THE MODERATING EFFECT OF COMPARTMENTALIZATION ON ROLE CONSENSUS AND WORK-LIFE BALANCE: AN INVESTIGATION ON MANAGERIAL LEVEL EMPLOYEES IN DOMESTIC COMMERCIAL BANKS IN SRI LANKA

R. Jayasuriya, B.J.H. Arachchige

Abstract


In a complex, dynamic, fiercely competitive business environment and a society filled with conflicting responsibilities and commitments, work–life balance has become one of the predominant issues in today’s workplace. As the organizations are constantly concerned over employees’ well-being, creating an organizational environment in which a desirable level of work–life balance can be experienced by an employee has become a constant challenge and a contemporary people management issue for many organizations. Employees are required to achieve results in an effective and efficient manner, while performing multiple roles on the professional and personal front. The various work role demands they encounter place pressure on them to achieve success which in turn hinders their level of work–life balance. This study investigates the relationship between role consensus and work–life balance and the moderating effect of compartmentalization between the two constructs among the managerial level employees working in domestic commercial banks in Sri Lanka. A sample of 180 managerial level employees was selected from the twelve domestic commercial banks and surveyed using a questionnaire. Results suggest that role consensus has a significant negative influence on work–life balance and that compartmentalization moderates the impact. Findings also highlighted the importance of organizational consideration for various work role demands placed on managers.

 

Keywords: Role Consensus, Work–Life Balance, Compartmentalization, Contemporary issues in HRM, Sri Lanka

For full paper: fmscresearch@sjp.ac.lk

 


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Faculty of Management Studies & Commerce